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Archive for the ‘National Trust’ Category

P1150533  ©   JY  of  jtdytravels

P1150533 © JT of jtdytravels

In the hills behind the Cornish coastal town of Penzance, in the small village of Madron, is the National Trust Property of Trengwainton Garden.   Although the manor house at the top of the garden is still a private residence, the garden is open to the public.  We walked up the long gentle slope of this rather narrow garden by a winding path through dense plantings; we returned by the main driveway bedecked with Rhododendron on one side and a small stream planted with bog plants on the other.  The moorland misty rain had returned, but that didn’t dampen our enjoyment of this lovely garden.

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P1150460  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150460 © JT of jtdytravels

This garden is known for its collections of magnolias, rhododendron and camellias.

Although some had finished flowering, there were plenty left for us to enjoy.

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P1150517  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150517 © JT of jtdytravels

I love azaleas; so simple and simply beautiful, especially when jewelled with rain drops.

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P1060386  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060386 © JT of jtdytravels

Because spring had come late to Cornwall, there were still some magnolia flowers to enjoy.

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P1150472  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150472 © JT of jtdytravels

Both sides of the winding pathway are densely planted with a wide variety of plants…

plants that have their origins in many places across the globe.

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P1150474  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150474 © JT of jtdytravels

The ‘gulf stream’ climate here is perfect for the Australian native, Dicksonia.

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P1060390  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060390 ©  DY of jtdytravels

Many new season fronds were just beginning to uncurl.

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P1060396  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060396 ©  DY of jtdytravels

The unusual Fuchsia excorticata is a native plant of New Zealand.  Sometimes known in Cornwall by the common name of ‘Sunburn Tree’, the trunk of this large fuchsia is characterised by its red peeling bark.  This flower has an unusual blue pollen. The flowers are followed by dark purple, almost black berries, which some people say are delicious either raw or cooked.

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P1150463  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150463 © JT of jtdytravels

Some of the branches of the older trees have grown into strange shapes as they have sought the sun.

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P1060382  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060382 © JT of jtdytravels

Delightful rhododendron bells draw attention to themselves against swathes of dark green foliage .

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P1060403  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060403 © DY of jtdytravels

We think this plant belongs to the Malvacaea family of plants.

Does anyone know the name of this beauty?

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P1060404  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060404 © DY of jtdytravels

I’ve added two more photos of this flower in the hope that someone will identify it.

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P1060405  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060405 © DY of jtdytravels

In any case, it is a joy to behold!

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P1150487  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150487 © JT of jtdytravels

One densely planted part of the garden is backed by a large Pieris japonica.

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P1150486  ©  JT  of  jtsytravels

P1150486 © JT of jtdytravels

A closer look at the tree shows the beautiful softness of the combination of pinks and light greens.

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P1150495  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150495 © JT of jtdytravels

And a much closer look, shows the tiny bell like pink flowers of Pieris japonica.

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P1150502  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150502 © JT of jtdytravels

There are over 70 species of Hosta that can be used as dense and attractive ‘fillers’ along garden edges.

But, beware!  They are much loved as food by snails and slugs!

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P1060402  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060402 © DY of jtdytravels

On the other hand, they also act as beautiful receptacles for rain drops.

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P1150525  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150525 © JT of jtdytravels

As the spring flowers were beginning to fade in the garden,

so the summer flowering groups, like the hydrangeas, began to bloom.

It’s is certainly a garden for all seasons.

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P1060422  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060422 © DY of jtdytravels

The path crosses a small bridge where a pond is the highlight of the view.

It’s a good place to take a quiet rest

as the water bubbles out under the bridge over a small waterfall.

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P1060415  ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060415 © DY of jtdytravels

The light, misty rain persisted, but only enough to give rhododendron flowers a refreshing glow.

The name comes from Ancient Greek:  rhódon meaning “rose” and déndron meaning ” tree”.

This photo gives a real hint of the reason for the ‘rose’ tag.

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P1060431  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1060431 © DY of jtdytravels

Some rhododendron trees in their native habitats can grow very large indeed.

Even here, some were large enough to shelter beneath their branches.

That gave time to enjoy shapes of trunks and patterns on bark.

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P1150557 ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150557 © JT of jtdytravels

Above us, hung more of those delightful Rhododendron bells.

There are over 1000 species of this plant, so gardeners are spoilt for choice.

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P1060425  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060425 © JT of jtdytravels

Finally the house came into view.  We had reached the top of the path.

This property, not open to the public, was once the residence of the powerful and very wealthy Cornish Arundell Family,  From small beginnings in the early 1200’s, when their only possession was the manor of Treloy in the parish of St Columb Major, the Arundells reached the height of their wealth and influence in the late sixteenth century when this house was built.  By then the family owned twenty-eight manors in Cornwall as well as manors and other properties in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire.

The house was altered and extented in the 18th and 19th centuries and is now a Grade II listed building.  In 1814, this estate was bought by a Jamaican sugar plantation owner, Rose Price.  However, by 1833, his fortunes were diminished when his slaves in Jamaica were freed by the Emancipation Act.  In 1867, the house was bought by the Bolitho family.  Members of that family still live here.

The gardens were given to the National Trust in 1961 and are very well cared for by that organisation.  We’ll explore a very different part of this garden in our next Cornwall episode.

Jennie  and David

Photography copyright © JT and DY  of jtdytravels

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