Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘National Parks’ Category

Screen Shot 2015-07-29 at 4.56.42 PM

Petersburg Area Map by Google

From Petersburg, marked in red, we crossed the channel in our inflatable DIBs to a private landing pontoon on Kupreanof Island. From here we hiked into another part of Tongass National Forest to seek out some more of the native flora of the region.

P1130786

Kupreanof side of the channel © JT of jtdytravels; P1130786

One of the tricky parts about taking this whole expedition was that most landings were, of necessity, wet landings, requiring “wellington” or “mud” boots to negotiate the landing from the DIBs into icy waters and onto rocky shores. I chose to do none of the wet landings as I was being extra cautious of the slippery, wet, rocky shorelines. Why? My travel insurance didn’t cover any problems with my knees since it had been less than 24 months from my latest knee operation. Without cover, medical help in these parts would have been extremely expensive, to say the least.  I had other adventures which I shall write about later.

However, as no boots were required for this walk, I chose to join David and experience the forest with him. There was just one slight problem… the tide was well and truly out and the ramp from the landing pontoon to the walkway at the top was exceedingly steep! I took a very deep breath and inched my way a little nervously up the wet, wooden ramp.

©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130787

© JT of jtdytravels; P1130787

At the top, we divested ourselves of our life vests and just left them on the grass in amongst a patch of yellow buttercups. It was a wonderful feeling to be able to trust that they would remain there until our return!

P1100522

Myosotis sp. © DY of jtdytravels; P1100522

A patch of lovely Forget-me-nots, Myosotis sp., also grew close to the path.

These are not native but were introduced to America from Europe…

Somehow; sometime; by someone.

A forest weed!

P1100525

Rubus spectabilis © DY of jtdytravels; P1100525

Before we left the shoreline and entered the forest shade, we were delighted to find some the  bright red berries of Rubus spectabilis, Salmonberry. We just had to try them and indeed they are quite tasty… as well as being a spectacular berry, as its name suggests.

P1130788

© JT of jtdytravels; P1130788

Our first stop was at a small wooden ‘kiosk’ where Caroline showed us the map… that’s an important part of forest walking, just in case you lose your way. Not that that was likely to happen as it was a single file pathway and board walk for most of the way.

P1130790

© JT of jtdytravels; P1130790

I was most impressed that this trail facility had been built by the students in the High School’s construction class; each student has been recognised for their contribution.

P1130791

© JT of jtdytravels; P1130791

And I was further impressed that this project was a collaboration between several sections of the Petersburg community. That, too, was recognised by a plaque.

©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130789

Forest Path © JT of jtdytravels; P1130789

This is a National Forest and, as such, logging can be undertaken in a controlled way. The trees along this path by the shore were quite young… reforestation in progress.

P1130792

Ferns © JT of jtdytravels; P1130792

The path was edged with ferns.

P1130794

Lysichiton americanum © JT of jtdytravels; P1130794

Lysichiton americanum, Cabbage Skunk was also much in evidence.

The large leaves of this plant were used to wrap things in…

long before paper and plastics!

P1130804

© JT of jtdytravels; P1130804

Skunk leaves are not only large, but quite sculptural as well.

This one was close to perfection.

P1100476

Large sculptural leaves © DY of jtdytravels; P1100476

There were more wonderful shapes and textures in the leaves of the understory.

P1100521

Toadstool © DY of jtdytravels; P1100521

This was a great area to look for fungi.  How elegant is this?

Yes. David was down on his knees again for this shot.

P1100481

Menziesia Ferruginea © DY of jtdytravels; P1100481

Another example of the delightful False Azalea; Menziesia Ferruginea.

 David had found one of these on his first walk.

P1130796

Start of Kupreanof Trail © JT of jtdytravels; P1130796

After following the path parallel to the shore, we came to the start of the board walk that would take us along the Kupreanof Trail, up through the old growth forest to a boggy, muskeg plateau on top of the hill. It was a bit of a huffy, puffy walk with a great many steps of uneven height to negotiate, but there was plenty of interest to see along the way.

P1130797

Moss covered dead wood  © JT of jtdytravels; P1130797

There were several dead or dying trees along the way. When a tree dies and falls in a forest, it continues to play an important role by creating a light gap in the forest which provides the opportunity for new life. To begin with, here in this damp environment, the fallen trunk is quickly colonised by mosses. Then, as it rots, it becomes a ‘nurse log’ on which the next generation of forest trees will germinate and begin to grow. The forest floor here was littered with fallen limbs and trunks overgrown with moss, giving the place a slightly eerie feeling.

©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130798

The Boardwalk © JT of jtdytravels; P1130798

The boardwalk was still single file but at least it was two planks wide.

P1130805

Lush understory growth © Jt of jtdytravels; P1130805

Further up the hill we came to some lush forest with lots of healthy understory growth.

P1130808

Moss covered dead tree trunk © JT of jtdytravels; P1130808

Moss had certainly taken up residence on this small, dead tree trunk.

P1100482

Cornus canadensis © DY of jtdytravels; P1100482

This was a beautiful example of Cornus canadensis; Dwarf Dogwood or Bunchberry.

©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130811

Moss encrusted conifer © JT of jtdytravels; P1130811

The higher we climbed, the more daylight we began to see.

In this clearing, a brown moss had taken hold on almost every branch of a tall conifer.

P1130845

Feathery Moss on a Conifer © JT of jtdytravels; P1130845

This tree, a little further out of the dense forest,

was covered in lichen and a cream coloured, feathery moss.

P1100487

Muskeg plateau © DY of jtdytravels; P1100487

Up another flight of steps and we had finally arrived at our destination for the afternoon, a plateau of boggy muskeg with quite a different group of plants to enjoy and photograph.

We’ll look at them in the next diary posting.

Jennie and David

All photographs copyright ©  JT and DY  of  jtdytravels

More of our travels can be found on

www.dymusings.com

More of our travel photos are on

www.flickr.com/photos/jtdytravels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

After our morning exploration of Juneau it was time to meet our fellow “explorers” and hop onto a tour bus to travel 19km (12ml) north along one of Juneau’s two major roads (in blue on the map). Our destination was the base of the Mendenhall Glacier, the only glacier we would be able to get to, in a fairly close up and personal way, on this trip to the Inside Passage area of Alaska.

Map of Juneau

Map of Juneau

Mendenhall Glacier, top centre on the map, on the northern side of Mendenhall Lake, is a glacier in retreat.  Early mention of the glacier came from Joseph Whidbey, master of George Vancouver’s ship HMS Discovery, who visited the area in 1794. He noted that most waterways here were unnavigable because of ice flows from glaciers.

HMS Discovery

HMS Discovery

 

Of course, shipping was so much different then…. no ice breaking hulls and only wind power, so exploring in amongst the islands of the Inside Passage would have been all but impossible for such a sailing ship. Boat parties were sent out to chart some of the coasts of some of the islands. However, that was all that was possible before Vancouver turned south again to return to England.

By 1888, when the famous naturalist John Muir came to explore in the area, the native peoples, the Tlingits, inhabited part of the valley left by the retreating glacier. Muir gave the glacier the name Auke (or Auk) in honour of that group of Tlingits known as the Auk Kwaan. But the name was changed in 1891 to honour an American physicist and meteorologist, Thomas Mendenhall, the Superintendent of the US Coast Guard and Geodetic survey.

The glacier has been monitored since 1942, so it is known that Mendenhall Lake is a modern day lake, created by the large amount of moraine pushed down while the glacier has been retreating rather quickly, (2.82km or 1.75 ml), since 1958.  It is thought that the glacier has retreated a total of 4km (2.5ml) since the 1500s. With warming temperatures it is expected to retreat further.

Top section of Mendenhall Lake  ©  JT  of  jtdutravels P1130478

Top section of Mendenhall Lake © JT of jtdutravels P1130478

Viewed from the “Discovery Centre”, it’s easy to see how the glacier melt has gradually formed the lake with piles of murrain. Much of that moraine is now covered with young trees. The sides of the glacier are still all but devoid of vegetation. The glacier itself vanishes into the distance for 19 kilometres (12ml) to where it joins the vast Juneau Icefield.

Juneau Icefield

Juneau Icefield

There are a couple of ways to enjoy the icefields from the air,

either by small plane or by helicopter.

Our group took the option of viewing the glacier from ground level.

Juneau Icefield from maps in the Park Centre.

Juneau Icefield from maps in the Park Centre.

At the Discovery Centre, a map shows the extent of the Juneau Icefield which covers 3,900 square kilometres (1,500 sq ml) and crosses the border between USA and Canada. Mendenhall (pin pointed by the small banner on the left) is just one of 40 major glaciers spawned by this Icefield. There are also about 100 smaller ones. All are in retreat except for the Taku Glacier, centre right, which filled its valley with so much glacial moraine that it has blocked its own waterway. It can no longer calve and has steadily been growing.

A piece of calved ice ©  Jt  of  jtdytravels; P1130466

A piece of calved ice © Jt of jtdytravels; P1130466

Calving happens when a chunk of ice breaks off the face of a glacier. This chunk of ice now floats in the lake. The men in the row boat give an indication of scale as does the next photo. Most chunks that we saw calving were much smaller than this one and are invisible in the longer distance.

Mendenhall Glacier ©  JT  of jtdytravels; P1130473

Mendenhall Glacier © JT of jtdytravels; P1130473

There were two paths to follow. One through the trees towards the waterfall and one down to the lake’s edge. David chose the former; I chose the latter.

David’s aim was to seek out some of the native plants of the area.

Mine was to take a closer look at the glacier.

Face of Mendenhall Glacier © JT of jtdytravels; P1130459

Mendenhall Glacier © JT of jtdytravels; P1130459

The face of a glacier is a truly magnificent, awe inspiring sight.

It makes one feel quite small.

Close up of face of Glacier ©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130477

The face of the Glacier © JT of jtdytravels; P1130477

The leading edge of the glacier is very dirty although the ice itself has a lovely blue tinge. The dirtiness is made up of earth and rocks carved out from the mountain sides by the moving glacier.

Closer look at the face of the glacier ©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130468

Closer look at the face of the glacier © JT of jtdytravels; P1130468

An even closer look, thanks to my 30 times camera, shows the great, blue chunks of ice that will eventually calve from the glacier, each one shrinking the total ice mass. What will be the future of this glacier?  Who can tell? How much does global warming effect them? There are so, so many questions we need to answer about the health of glaciers… and of our beautiful planet!

Colours of ice! ©  JT  of jtdytravels; P1130471

Colours of ice! © JT of jtdytravels; P1130471

From afar the iceberg looks white. But what is white?

This close up shows the many colours that an artist would need to use.

Ice caves at Mendenhall.

Ice caves at Mendenhall.

The beautiful blue of the ice is much more evident under the glacier inside the Mendenhall Ice Caves. I found this photo in a wonderful set of photos of these ice caves on the internet and will add the site below for those who wish to enjoy that aspect of the glacier. Going into that cave is certainly something I wouldn’t do, but I’m always grateful to those who do and who share their experience.

Our thought for the day comes from the great naturalist, John Muir, who urged us all to:

“Keep close to Nature’s heart… and break clear away, once in awhile; climb a mountain or spend a week in a woods. Wash your spirit clean.”

This we hoped to do on this expedition into the wilderness of Alaska.

In our next post we’ll share a different aspect of our visit to Mendenhall Glacier…

 the native flora of the area, the Tongass National Forest.

Jennie and David

our other travel site is

www.dymusings.com

more travel photos are on our flickr site

www.flickr.com/photos/jtdytravels

The internet link to the site for photographs of the beauty of ice inside Mendenhall Glacier is

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/03/mendenhall-ice-caves_n_4374019.html

or

Ditch Your Responsibilities And Go Hike The Mendenhall Ice Caves

Read Full Post »

Welcome back, armchair travellers! David and I have just returned to Canberra from a three week sojourn on the west coast of USA and Canada where we enjoyed happy visits with friends and family in Vancouver, Vancouver Island and Santa Monica (LA); wandered for a few days in Seattle; and spent a week aboard the small ship “Sea Lion” exploring the the coves, inlets and forests of the Inside Passage of Alaska. Now that we’ve recovered somewhat from jet lag and have downloaded our photos, we’re ready to begin sharing some of our experiences with you in yet another wonderful part of our world.

Because it’s a place that many of you may not have had the opportunity to explore for yourselves, we’ll begin our stories with our trip into some stunningly beautiful wilderness areas of Alaska.

To begin that journey, we had to fly to the small, quiet town of Juneau, home to about 32,000 people. That’s a number that swells by upwards of 10,000 a day in the tourist season from May to September. The only way in or out of this town, surrounded as it is by mountains, is by sea or air. We arrived by air a day earlier than our group so that we would have time to explore the town.

Juneau as seen from Mount Roberts

Juneau as seen from Mount Roberts

Hemmed in by mountains on all sides, Juneau has always been dependant on the sea. Nowadays, the airport is situated on the level plains beyond the town. The flight path is quite exciting as it comes down between mountains that range from 1,100m to 1,200 m in height.

The airport is a very busy one because of the constant small plane and helicopter traffic. In fact, we were told that there are more planes in and out of Juneau per year than fly in and out of LAX in busy Los Angeles. Many people in Alaska have their own planes; it’s the popular way to get around.

Map of Juneau from sign post in the town

Map of Juneau from sign post in the town

It doesn’t take long to explore this small town, even though, by area, we were told, that it’s the second largest city in USA! Juneau is, in fact, the Capital of Alaska having been given that title in 1906 after the US took ownership of the Russian base of Sitka. The city is named after gold prospector Joe Juneau, though it was for a time called Rockwell and then Harrisburg. Joe Juneau and Richard Harris marked out 160 acres as a town site on October 18, 1880. A mining camp gradually grew on the site as more gold was discovered in the area.

The town is built on a grid pattern although there are two main roads. One runs alongside the Gastineau Channel while another heads up from the docks into town. This street is lined with souveneir shops since it is closest to the port and the coming and going of cruise liners. The main town is more interesting; it’s the place where locals shop and it’s where we spent most time. We had breakfast at the Heritage coffee shop… not Starbucks, though of course they are there. The coffee was so, so much better to our Australian taste at Heritage!

Local shopping street in Juneau ©  P1130408 by JT of jtdytravels

Local shopping street in Juneau © P1130408 by JT of jtdytravels

It doesn’t take a lot of time to explore here; we just browsed.

So why not come for a wander with us!

Art in the streets © DY  of jtdytravels P1100166

Art in the streets © DY of jtdytravels P1100166

One of the first things to catch the eye are the colourful banners.

Bold, brash, colourful and cheerful.

They are everywhere.

King Crab Banner ©  DY  of  jtdytravels; P1100213

King Crab Banner © DY of jtdytravels; P1100213

Each individual banner is someone’s art.

This one evokes the warmth of the summer sun,

the beauty of the channel and mountains

and the taste of my favourite Alaskan food, King Crab.

Detail of King Crab ©  DY  of  jtdytravels P1100213 - Version 2

Detail of King Crab © DY of jtdytravels; P1100213 – Version 2

It’s not hard to imagine the members of the Juneau version of the “stitch and bitch” group getting together on long cold, dreary winter days to make these wonderful banners. Maybe they do, maybe they don’t, but I rather hope they do. Social contact and a focus on something so uplifting and cheerful would be very beneficial in a place that experiences long dark days. We were in Juneau on the longest day of their year. We would experience almost 22 hours of daylight every day of our trip. But in winter, those hours are more like 6 hours of daylight (not necessarily sunshine as it is most likely raining or snowing!) and 18 hours of black darkness. There are not many visitors to Juneau in winter. Contact with the outside world is a summer thing. Winter can be a time of increased mental stress for many and getting together to make such banners would be a fun thing to do.

Baskets of flowers line most street. ©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130414

Baskets of flowers line most streets. © JT of jtdytravels; P1130414

Hanging baskets of flowers also brighten up the streetscape

after the long, cold, dreary, wet winter!

Petunias make a happy statement to all who pass by.

A delightful geranium © JT  of jtdytravels; P1130440

A bumble visits geraniums © JT of jtdytravels; P1130440

It seems that every town in the world uses

delightful geraniums to brighten up garden beds and sidewalks.

Cheerful flowers along sidewalk © DY  of jtdytravels

Cheerful Rudbeckia flowers along sidewalk © DY of jtdytravels; P1100149

There were many other flowers, like this Rudbeckia, or cone flower,

bringing the feel of sunshine to the side walks.

Cheerful flowers brighten the sidewalks © DY  of jtdytravels

Taking a closer look!  © DY of jtdytravels; P1100148

As most of you know, both David and I are avid flower photographers.

We enjoyed these well known garden plants but

we were also hoping to find many native plants on walks in the forests.

An inviting book shop; © JT of jtdytravels P1130409

An inviting book shop; © JT of jtdytravels; P1130409

Rainy Retreat! I do like this type of inviting bookshop.

And yes it does rain, often, in Juneau.

You can’t have the famous Alaskan glaciers without precipitation.

Records show an average of 93 inches of rain over 240 days in a year.

Add to that, 70 inches of snow over 30 days in the year.

Luckily for us, June/July has a low amount of rainfall.

Eye catching book title  ©  JT  of jtdytravels; P1130447

Eye catching book title © JT of jtdytravels; P1130447

What a great name for a book; it certainly catches the eye!

It’s author is cartoonist, Matthew Inman.

We wondered if we would meet any grizzly bears on our travels….

and if so, would they be wearing underpants…

or would we need clean ones!

Large mural on side of City Hall ©  JT  of jtdytravels; P1130417

Large mural on side of City Hall © JT of jtdytravels; P1130417

The wildlife doesn’t look particularly friendly

as depicted in this large mural along the side of the Juneau City Hall!

An Alakan no smoking sign ©  JT  of  jtdytravels ; P1130490

An Alaskan no smoking sign © JT of jtdytravels ; P1130490

Most cafes and shops are non smoking places, thank goodness,

and most have this great sign in their windows.

We hoped to see some puffins in the wild on our journey.

An interesting souveneir! ©  JT  of  jtdytravels; P1130491

An interesting souveneir! © JT of jtdytravels; P1130491

Indeed, it seemed to us that the people of Juneau have a great sense of humour.

We left this souveneir in the shop, but did buy a couple of tee shirts and

a small harbour seal ornament for our Christmas tree.

We always add some small momento of our travels to our tree.

A great motto  ©  JT of jtdytravels; P1130445

A great motto © JT of jtdytravels; P1130445

There may be ships, boats and small planes aplenty in Juneau,

but there are no hot air balloon rides.

This poster was inspirational; it made a very good ‘thought for the day’!

.

In our next post, we’ll join our group to visit Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau.

It’s the only glacier we could visit by bus and on foot.

Jennie and David

Some of our other travel adventures are on

www.dymusings.com

and travel photos on

www.flickr.com/photos/jtdytravels

AND

you can watch a youtube film of the approach and landing at Juneau airport on

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uWsqKR0dxRg

Read Full Post »

For the keen walker, there are walks in abundance from the village of Iluka.  The walk beside Iluka Bay is the gentlest.  But there are walks along the beaches facing the Pacific Ocean and even more through a rainforest and through Bundjalong National Park.

P1240948  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240948 © JT of jtdytravels

The main road from the Pacific Highway into Iluka goes through the Bundjalung  National Park.  Side roads lead off into the forest and to the bluffs and beaches of the Pacific Ocean. The roads are unsealed but in good condition and the drive through tunnels of trees is a peaceful start to a day out in the bush.

.

P1240877  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240877 © JT of jtdytravels

The best known, and very well set up bush parking area is at Iluka Bluff.  Leaving the car here, you can choose to enjoy a walk or a rest on the beach, pick your way across the rocks at the headland, climb up to the bluff or walk in the forest; or do all of the above.

.

P1240879  ©  JT  f jtdytravels

P1240879 © JT f jtdytravels

My first choice was the beach – not to swim or laze in the sun but to walk.

When I was there, this beach was not patrolled, so care is needed if swimming.

One part of this beach is called Shark Bay – enough said!

.

P1240885  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240885 © JT of jtdytravels

I shared this long beautiful stretch of coast with just two other people.

With a gentle sea on one side

and a forest alive with native birds on the other

it was a most pleasant walk.

There would no doubt be many more people enjoying this beach in summer.

P1240881  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240881 © JT of jtdytravels

However, this is not a bare foot beach.  It’s made up of small shells so …

a good pair of walking shoes was essential.

.

P1240896  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240896 © JT of jtdytravels

Coming back from my beach walk, I began to explore the rocky headland.

It was the resting place that morning for hundreds of birds, most of them small terns.

.

P1240893  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240893 © JT of jtdytravels

Amongst them were Cormorants and, of course, sea gulls.

.

P1240902  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240902 © JT of jtdytravels

My favourite bird of the morning was this Brahminy Kite (Haliastur Indus).  I had taken a short bush walk to get further out on the rocks below the bluff.  I found this magnificent bird sitting on a rock shelf quietly finishing off a feed of fish.  T’was a magic moment.

Brahminy Kites feed exclusively on fish and other marine animals.  I have read that they often scavenge for dead fish floating on the surface rather than catching live fish.  Once this bird had finished its meal, I enjoyed watching it soar high over the rock platform.

Iluka is almost to the southern edge of the Brahminy Kite’s range.  They occur only in warmer coastal areas and on offshore islands; in the eastern states they may occur from Port Macquarie north and, in Western Australia, they can be seen north of Carnarvon.  We saw them in the tidal rivers of the Kimberleys when we were there a few years ago.

 .

P1240910  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240910 © JT of jtdytravels

There are good paths through the seaside scrub which seems to be alive with birds.

Most are impossible to photograph as they flit through the trees.

.

P1240912  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240912 © JT of jtdytravels

Some are much more used to human company. This magpie joined me on my walk.

.

P1240913  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240913 © JT of jtdytravels

A Masked Lapwing was a little more wary as he trotted across a more open area of park.

.

P1240939  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240939 © JT of jtdytravels

The common Australian native tree, the Paper Bark, Melaleuca sp., abounds in this park.

Birds love them and some artists like to use the papery bark in their creations.

However, collecting this bark in a National Park is not permitted.

Take only photos, leave only footprints – that’s the rule.

  .

P1240947  ©  Jt  of  jtdytravels

P1240947 © Jt of jtdytravels

Day visitors are well catered for with plenty of tables in shady places for picnics.

There are also eco friendly long drop, composting toilets near the car park.

.

P1240938  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240938 © JT of jtdytravels

A shaded, raised information area also has a picnic table and tank water.

.

P1240935  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240935 © JT of jtdytravels

From the information platform, a steep set of steps leads up towards the top of the bluff.

.

P1240922  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240922 © JT of jtdytravels

From the top of the steps, a steepish gravelled path with steps leads further upwards.

A more gentle board walk path then leads on through the bush.

.

P1240921  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240921 © JT of jtdytravels

There are some interesting trees to look at along the way.

.

P1240934  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240934 © JT of jtdytravels

A volunteer landcare group has been busy cleaning out weeds in this area.

They’ve also planted several more native trees and bushes.

.

P1240924  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240924 © JT of jtdytravels

Finally, the look out comes into view.

And the view from the top is well worth the climb.

This is a great place to watch for whales on their migration route.

Looking south is the breakwater lined mouth of the Clarence River.

Yamba can be seen on the hill beyond.

Iluka is further back to the right behind another long, sandy beach.

.

P1240927  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240927 © JT of jtdytravels

The sound and sight of waves folding over rocks below is something I always enjoy.

.

P1240926  ©  Jt  of jtdytravels

P1240926 © Jt of jtdytravels

There were many more walks I could have taken in this National Park,

but I was happy to take a rest here

and enjoy the solitude and the beauty of the sea scape.

The other walks will have to wait until I return some other time!

Jennie

Photography  © Copyright  JT  of  jtdytravels

More travel stories and photos of our overseas adventures can be found on

http://www.jtdytravels.com

.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts