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Archive for the ‘Gardens of the World’ Category

The third section of the delightful Conservatory Garden in the northern section of Central Park, Manhattan, was inspired by English gardens. Here you will find a beautiful selection of trees and herbaceous borders surrounding a central, secret, water lily pool.

P1100841  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100841 © JT of jtdytravels

Walking towards the “Secret Garden”

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P1100842  ©  JT  ofd  jtdytravels

P1100842 © JT ofd jtdytravels

Concentric bands of paths give a maze like structure to this garden.

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P1100854  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100854 © JT of jtdytravels

Greens predominate with a clever use of shape and texture.

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P1100846  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100846 © JT of jtdytravels

Feathery textures are also used to good effect.

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P1100847  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100847 © JT of jtdytravels

The water lily pond in the centre of the garden.

This pond was dedicated in 1936 to the memory of Frances Hodgson Burnett, whose story of the “Secret Garden” has captured the hearts of so many, young and old. The story was originaly published in 1910 in serial format but was published as a book in 1911. It has become a classic of English children’s literature and over the years has been adapted to film and TV.

This garden, like the book upon which it is based, explores the healing power of gardens, and indeed, of all living things. There is also a powerful message here that being in a quiet place amongst living things can help to bring calm to the mind, to transform negative thoughts into positive thoughts, helping both psychological and physical well being. This is a garden that gives a much needed sense of tranquility in an otherwise very busy city.

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P1100850  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100850 © JT of jtdytravels

Mary and Dickon; sculpture by Bessie Potter Vonnoh

The sculpture represents Mary and Dickon, the central characters of the book, who find healing of both mind and body in the secret garden they discover, a garden that had been locked away from everyone for many years. Mary holds a bowl of water for two little robins. It was a robin that lead Mary to find the secret garden. The robin had turned up some soil and it was there that Mary found the key to the garden. No key is required to enter this secret garden, just the desire to spend some time in the peace and quiet of a tranquil, beautiful space in a very big city.

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P1100855  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100855 © JT of jtdytravels

Simple flowers add just a touch of colour to this garden.

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P1100852  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100852 © JT of jtdytravels

A closer look at some of the feathery grasses.

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P1080871  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080871 © DY of jtdytravels

We could have stayed much longer but rain clouds threatened.

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P1100862  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100862 © JT of jtdytravels

The northern end of Central Park.

We had to tear ourselves away from the beautiful and peaceful Conservatory Garden and head back towards the city before the rain came down. This part of Central Park is itself very attractive with undulating lawns, large rock faces and many trees, some of them not very old.

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P1080879  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080879 © DY of jtdytravels

Fifth Avenue near the Met Art Gallery.

With the rain cloud becoming ever more threatening, we came out of the park onto the famous Museum Mile on Fifth Avenue and made our way to the fabulous Metropilitan Museum of Art.

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P1100880 ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100880 © JT of jtdytravels

New York Metropilitan Museum of Art

There we had lunch in the member’s lounge before spending the rest of the day being entranced by a wonderful exhibition called “Assyria” which transported us as far back as 11th century BC. You could spend many happy rainy afternoons exploring this art gallery with its changing exhibitions adding constant new attractions to the many, many permanent exhibitions.

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P1100893  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100893 © JT of jtdytravels

Sun shining on one of the fountains at The Met.

By the time we emerged from The Met, the rain had passed and rays of sunshine were sparkling on one of the fountains in front of The Met. We made our way back to our friend’s apartment ready to relax our tired feet after what had been a truly enjoyable day in Manhattan.

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P1080807  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080807 © DY of jtdytravels

View down the East River, New York.

And put our feet up we did as we watched barges move slowly down the East River towards Brooklyn in the late afternoon light. T’was a delightful way to unwind, again away from the chaos and hustle and bustle of New York. With a view like this to enjoy every day, I understand why our friends like to live in New York. We thank them for their wonderful hospitality… and the view.

Jennie and David

All Phot0graphs ©  Copyright JT and DY of jtdytravels

other photos and stories of our journeys can be found on

www.dymusings.com

www.flickr.com/photos/jtdytravels

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After leaving the green lawns and formal hedges of the Italianate garden in Central Park’s Conservatory Garden, it comes as something of a shock to walk into the next section of the garden and see a riot of colourful flowers.

P1100821  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100821 © JT of jtdytravels

Overview of the French Garden

This French influenced garden is oval in shape. A clipped hedge protects the outer border of colourful flowers while the apron of the fountain pool is surrounded by a partierre style garden of green and red. Beyond are the trees of the main park with a path leading away from this small contained garden to the wide acres of Central Park and the waters of Harlem Mere.

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P1100836  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100836 © JT of jtdytravels

The plants of the partiere are left unclipped with a shaggy, soft appearance.

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P1100822  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100822 © JT of jtdytravels

The floral border was a mass of Korean Chrysanthemums.

Korean Mums ( Dendranthema) are very hardy and grow in a loose and graceful mounds.  Their dark-green foliage stays fresh all season. According to garden officianados in the North Eastern Sates of US, these Mums suffer no bug or disease problems worth mentioning and the 3-inch daisy-like blossoms don’t have the aroma that other Mums seem to exude. (Apparently, some people don’t like the smell of conventional Mums.)  All in all, a good plant to grow in this part of the world. I wonder how they’d grow here in Canberra, in Australia. We might try!

I love daisy-like flowers and photographing these blooms was a delight.

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P1100826  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100826 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1100827 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1100831 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1100833 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1100830  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100830 © JT of jtdytravels

Notes from the New York Botanic Garden tell us that “Korean Mums were first hybridized (bred) in Connecticut in the 1930s by a nurseryman named Alex Cummings. He was working on hybridizing cold-hardy varieties that would flourish in New England temperatures. He came across a tall plant, a wild species he mistakenly identified as Chrysanthemum coreanum. Breeding from that plant resulted eventually in these lavish Korean Mums.

The original species was native to Korea, so the popular name of “Korean Mum” is correct. Their spectacular, daisy-like flowers come in a wide range of colors, from pale yellow and dusty pink to burnt-orange and fiery red. They certainly make a vibrant show in the autumn months in the Conservatory Garden. ( If you come here in the Spring time, you can enjoy a lavish display of colourful tulips.)

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P1080850  © DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080850 © DY of jtdytravels

After inspecting and photographing this wonderful display, we took time out to just sit on one of the benches with our New York friend and enjoy the beauty of one of her favourite quiet places.

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P1100835  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100835 © JT of jtdytravels

The fountain in the middle of the pond is a bronze copy of the joyful “Three Maidens Fountain” by German Sculptor, Walter Schott. Here in this garden, it’s also known as the Untermyer Fountain in memory of a well known civic leader, Samual Untermyer. The sculture once graced his estate in Yonkers, New York and was given to the city as a gift by his children after his death in 1940.

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P1080834  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080834 © DY of jtdytravels

The fountain exudes the joy of life and really lifts your spirits as you watch, half expecting the maidens to begin to laugh as they dance. Their dresses cling to their bodies as if perpetually wet from the spray of the fountain!

Beyond the fountain there are borders of perennial plants and a rose covered archway.

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P1080832  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080832 © DY of jtdytravels

Another view of the garden through some perennial plants.

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P1100818  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100818 © JT of jtdytravels

The perennials add even more bright colour to the garden.

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P1100818 - Version 2  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100818 – Version 2 © JT of jtdytravels

A closer look! Stunningly beautiful.

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P1100820  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100820 © JT of jtdytravels

Sunshine yellow against dark foliage is an interesting combination.

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P1100837  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100837 © JT of jtdytravels

This French section of the Conservatory Garden is indeed a very pleasant and quiet place to spend time away from the chaos of the city. But we had not yet finished our exploration of this secret part of Central Park. We still had the third section of the garden to explore, the English Garden, and we’ll visit there in my next posting.

Jennie and David

All photography copyright ©  Jennie Thomas and David Young

of

jtdytravels

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Not being a fan of chaotic big cities, but being in New York to visit family and friends, we set ourselves the task of finding the quieter places, places to escape. And one of those places is a small six acre section of that great, green space, Central Park.

P1100863  ©  JT of jtdytravels

P1100863 © JT of jtdytravels

Many people know the beauty and the facilities of Central Park but few know that there is a ‘secret garden’ very close to this north-eastern section of the park.

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Google Map of Conservatory Garden, NY

Google Map of Conservatory Garden, NY

To get there, we travelled north along Park Avenue by bus from 59th Street to 106th Street. ( We could have taken the subway # 6 to 103rd Street Station.) It was then but a short walk west to to the gates of the Conservatory Garden in 5th Avenue opposite 105th Street. This area is the border between Manhattan and Harlam, and Harlam, as many of our age will remember, did not always have the best of reputations for safety. So much has changed in New York and safety is one thing I noticed had really changed. The city still has an edge to it but we felt as safe as we do at home in Australia.

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P1080818  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080818 © DY of jtdytravels

David and me in front of the Vanderbilt Gate.

The main entry to the Conservatory Garden is through a magnificent wrought iron gate, the Vanderbilt Gate. This gate was designed by an American architect, George B Post and made in France. It was used for many years at the entrance to the estate of Cornelius Vanderbilt ll whose home stood at the corner of 5th Avenue and 58th Street.

We were about to step into a garden that not so long ago was an area avoided by most, a derelict area of filth, of drugs and of crime, a place where no one in their right mind would enter. But that was then. This is now. And the transormation is the result of the vision of one woman and the hard work of many volunteers who followed her vision.

The Conservatory Garden is named for the original conservatory glasshouses that were used by the Central Park to grow on plants for the park. They fell into disrepair when the cost of maintaining the glasshouses became too great and they were finally demolished in 1937. In their place a new garden was developed by Betty Sprout and Gilmore Clarke and it was maintained until the 1960s when it too became unmanageable. It stayed unloved and unkempt for twenty years.

This area became a very dangerous place to be, neglected, fullof garbage, the haunt of drug addicta and dealers; a place with a very high cime rate.  That was until a landscape gardener named Lyndon B Miller was approached by a friend to see if she thought the garden could be restored. What a sight met her eyes… but thankfully she saw the potential. But restoring a garden costs money and takes time. Photographs of French and English gardens were shown to possible sponsors and volunteers from the New York Garden Club came to the fore to help. This garden is a tesatment to the value of a garden in the social life of a city. Crime has disappeared and it’s now a place of peace and relaxation.

In 1983, a Women’s Committee was founded to make sure that Central Park and the Conservatory Garden remain in good condition for the people of New York and their visitors. They raise funds through Charity events, through the sale of plaques on the park benches ( there are some 9,000 benches in Central Park!), through the adoption of trees, and through donations to help buy the many tulips and other flowers that adorn the Conservatory Garden.

New Yorkers, and visitors like us, have much for which to thank these women. Certainly many of the 1,000 plus members probably live in close proximity to the park… for aprtment dwellers, it’s somewhat akin to having your own garden. But these women raise many millions of dollars to help keep the park and its facitlities in good order. I’m sure those who founded this park and the Conservatory Garden would be thrilled to see their vision still alive and vibrant today.

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P1080820  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080820 © DY of jtdytravels

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This garden is a designated QUIET Zone… something very rare in new York! It’s for those who want to quietly enjoy a stroll in beautiful surroundings where there are no bicycles or horse drawn carriages or runners to dodge, let alone people out for a brisk walk with their dogs. In this secret garden you will share peace and space with other like minded folk who seek to sit quietly, to read or just to stroll in the beautiful Conservancy Garden. Let’s go inside and enjoy its beauty.

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Aerial View of the Conservancy Gardens in Spring

Aerial View of the Conservancy Gardens in Spring

The photo above comes from the Park’s website and shows the layout of the Conservatory Garden.There are three sections, each one reminiscent of one of the great classical gardens of England, Italy and France. On the left is the gentle English Garden; in the centre a classic Italianate Garden bordered by the pink and white of crab apples in the spring time. Beyond the lawn and the fountain is a raised area backed by an extraordinary, semi circular wisteria arch, a pleasant pace to sit and read in the heat of summer, I would imagine. On the right is the more formal French styled garden which has plantings of tulips in the spring and Chrysanthemums in the autumn.

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P1100809  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100809 © JT of jtdytravels

The Italian Garden

The first garden to greet you after you enter the gate is the expansive lawn of the Italianate Garden. This is a favourite place for weddings and for wedding photo shoots. We were there on a week day, so it was all very peaceful. Beyond the lawn is the cool arbour od wisteria. It must be a magic sight, and fragrance, in late spring. We were there in October and the crab apple trees were just beginning to change colour.

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P1080852  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080852 © DY of jtdytravels

From the fountain, looking back across the lawn to part of Mount Sinai Hospital.

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P1080853  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1080853 © DY of jtdytravels

Close up of the fountain.

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P1080856  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080856 © DY of jtdytravels

Autumnal leaves on a small pool.

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P1080858  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080858 © DY of jtdytravels

Portrait of autumn leaf on water.

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P1100810  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1100810 © JT of jtdytravels

Beside the Italian garden is a quiet avenue of trees, a favourite place for those who just want to sit and read in a shady place, seemingly far from the chaos of the city. And yet, 5th Avenue is really only meters away!

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P1080832  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1080832 © DY of jtdytravels.

The French Garden

To the right of the Italian Garden is a garden with a French influence. It’s a small sunken garden filled with flowers. The unexpected sight of so many flowers and such a riot of colour in Central Park, or any where in Manhattan, comes as a bit of a surprise… a very pleasant surprise. This photo is a just a taste of what’s to come in my next post… so stay tuned!

Jennie and David

Photography copyright ©  Jennie Thomas and David Young

jtdytravels

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Salzburg was hot in mid July, very, very hot and humid. It was also crowded, very crowded with tourists who had arrived in town for the annual Salzburg Music Festival and to see the newly opened Dom Quarter Museums and former Residence of some of the Salzburg ruling Prince Archbishops. And, it was school holidays. Not the best time to be in Salzburg! I had not been to this celebrated baroque city since 1969 when we were able to wander in peace and to imagine how it must have been in Mozart’s time. This time, that was just not possible. Perhaps the best time to visit Salzburg, the famed Baroque city, the Rome of the North, is in the spring or autumn. Then it may still be possible to wander quietly and not have to jostle your way around the streets which are indeed filled with beautiful buildings, all looking well maintained. We bought a two day Salzburg Card so that we wouldn’t have to line up at ticket offices but even that is not much help when every venue is so full of people. I chose our hotel close to the Mirabell Palace and Gardens which I had long wanted to visit. From there, I thought,we could walk everywhere and that would be good. I didn’t count on the hot weather! We found the pavements were so hot that, after some walking, our feet ‘burned’ in our shoes. And even when we arrived ‘home’ from our exploring in the evning there was no relief from the heat. Our hotel purported to be four star, but there was no air con., not even a fan, and only one opening window. In general, Salzburg hotels provide for the need for warmth in the winter not for cooling in the summer. With heat well over 30 degrees until late into the evening and not a breath of air all night, it was not at all pleasant. It was all a bit of shock to us after the cool evening breezes at our previous stay beside the lake at St Wolfgang.   Mirabell Schloss and Gardens, Salzburg On our first day in Salzburg, we walked to the Mirabell Schloss, a Palace built in 1606 by Prince-Archbishop Wolf Deitrich to celebrate his love for his mistress Salome Alt.  With Salome, Wolf Deitrich had had fifteen children, ten of whom survived. He named the Schloss, Altenau, but it was renamed Mirabell by the next Prince-Archbishop, Markus Sitticus who had had Wolf Deitrich imprisoned in the Hohenslazburg Fort.

Like almost every visitor to this palace, we climbed the outside steps to a position on a small hill beside the Palace. From there we looked into the distance across the formal Mirabell Gardens to the dome of Salzburg Cathedral, the Dom, and on up towards the Hohensalzburg Fortress on its perch high above the city. To get there was our goal for the afternoon. .

Marble staircase at Mirabell Schloss

Marble staircase at Mirabell Schloss

What I particularly wanted to see in this palace, was its magnificent baroque Marble Hall, the ballroom.  During the years 1721 to 1727, the then Prince-Archbishop, Franz Anton von Harrach, employed the the famous baroque architect, Lukas von Hildebrandt, to redesign the palace. He was resposible for the stunning beauty of the ballroom. In this room, a young Mozart and his sister, Nannerl, once played for the aristocracy. Concerts are still held in this hall.

The Marble Hall and the massive marble staircase in the palace, were fortunately untouched by a fire which swept through the city of Salzburg on April 30th, 1818. Although we were able to climb that staircase and see the many cherubs balancing on the balustrade and view the beautiful sculptures by Georg Raphael Donner that adorn all the large niches, we did did not see the ballroom.  It was closed to visitors that day because of a continuous stream of Saturday afternoon weddings. It’s apparently a very popular place for civil weddings… and why not? .

Modern altar and stain glass windows of St Andras Kirche on Mirabellaplatz, Salztburg.

Modern altar and stain glass windows of St Andras Kirche on Mirabellaplatz, Salztburg.

Just across the road from Mirabell Gardens is St Andräs Church. It’s not one of Salzburg’s famed baroque churches. It’s newer, being built in the 1890s.  The simplicity of its interior without any elaborate detail and the modern style of art works was a refreshing change. IHere the church is dominated by a stylised altar, art work by Karl Weiser, and three figurative glass windows. I’ve always been fascinated by the development of pictorial glass windows through the centuries. These three windows represent St Mary and the saints, each figure represented being named on an interpretive board in the side aisle of the church. As well as being fascinated by the variety of religious art through the ages, we found on this particular day that churches indeed also offered the coolest place for respite from the heat. We hoped to return here for an evening organ concert. On Thursday mornings the large square in front of this church changes from being a car park at a main bus/tram stop to being a colourful farmer’s market…. a pity we weren’t there on a Thursday. Next time perhaps! .

The church of the Holy Trinity, Salzburg.

The church of the Holy Trinity, Salzburg.

Still on the right bank of the river, on our way to the old town and Dom Quarter, we popped into the Holy Trinity Church, the Dreifaltigkeitskirche.  It’s part of a large seminary for the training of priests. I had thoughts of another quiet rest stop but, just inside the door, our way was barred by a grill.  At least it was cool in there. This church, although in the Baroque style, is much simpler in style that many baroque interiors in Austria and elsewhere in Europe. The floor of the church is elliptical in shape, as is the dome above. .

The imposing towers of Salzburg Cathedral, the Dom.

The imposing towers of Salzburg Cathedral, the Dom.

Crossing the river, we jostled with hundreds of other tourists in the narrow streets making enjoyment of the buildings an impossibility. We finally came to the large Dom Square and headed for the Dom. We were both looking forward to our visit there and perhaps a quiet sit in the cool as we took in the magnificence of this masterpiece of Salzburg’s buildings. That was not to be! The crowd trying to get into the church was huge. We were not aware of the fact at the time, and there were no signs to alert us to the fact, that there was a concert about to begin. We thought we would just have to wait our turn to get inside. When we got closer to the door, we realised that a concert was indeed about to begin. All tickets sold. By now we had become unwittingly caught up in the push and shove of the crowd as people pushed their way in to claim a better seat. We, of course, were not allowed past the door, so had to fight our way back out! It was a nightmare made more so by a lady pushing a wheel chair who was determined that she would run over my toes rather than let me get back out. It’s moments like that a really good knowledge of the language would have been helpful. We decided to retreat to a small restaurant for a meal. We had not had lunch so something to eat was in order plus we needed a break from the heat and crowds. It would have been nice to sit in one of the shaded small streets where the sun never gets a chance to enter. But the street side cafés were, as usual in Austria, full of smokers. We finally found a small air conditioned place where we were able to enjoy a delicious salad and cold water. It was great to have a rest in a quiet spot that, for once on this hot day, was not in a church. .

The main Dom Square, Salzburg.

The main Dom Square, Salzburg.

After that we headed back to the main Dom Square  but the heat coming off the vast area of white pebbles was relentless, so we needed to have a plan B. .

The soaring stone pillars of the Franciscan Church, Salzburg.

The soaring stone pillars of the Franciscan Church, Salzburg.

Well, there was another church nearby. There seemed to be churches everywhere. This one was the Franciscan Church and although it was busy with tourists, at least it was cool in there. This church, like the more famous baroque Dom, has its origins right back in Salzburg’s early Christian period. But whilst the Dom was a bishop’s church, and thus of the aristocracy, the Franciscan church was built as a church of the people, by aspiring Salzburg burghers and business men. The early church was constantly being destroyed by fire. But the current Gothic style church, dating back to the 1400s, was constructed of solid stone with soaring pillars and an air of elegance. It’s meant to be a place of quiet meditation…. That is, it should be, except for the babble of tourists. .

The Hohensalsburg Fortress high on a rocky crag above the city.

The Hohensalsburg Fortress high on a rocky crag above the city.

Perhaps, we thought, it might be a little cooler up on the hill where the old fort was built. Our Saltzburg Card included a ride up there on the funicular and entrance fees to the fort. So to the Fort we went. And that was a very good idea. At least there was a zephyr of a breeze up there. .

An image of the fort almost as it is today after centuries of bits being added on.

An image of the fort in 1653, almost as it is today.

And inside the very thick old stone walls of the fort there were some cool, quiet spots with seats to rest and take in this massive old fortress. The fort was begun in 900 and has been added to over the centuries until the late 1600s. In one area there was a video display of computer generated images of the way the fort had grown over the years. It had begun with just a small square building and grew to meet the needs of the town’s defences. I took photos of a few of the images. I was fascinated by the archeology and the way the story of the fort has been pieced together. The photo above is more or less the fort as it is today, much the same as in 1653. It is very large and contains many, many steps! David went on to climb those myriad steps and explore more of the fort while I enjoyed a quiet time under a very old tree in the main courtyard. It was a much better option for me! .

The view from the Fortress down across the old city of Salzburg.

The view from the Fortress down across the old city of Salzburg.

Later, we went up onto the parapet that gives a wonderful view down over the city with the Dom taking centre stage. From there we could see just how far we had walked, from beyond the trees near the river in the centre distance. And we could also see how far we had to walk to get back to the hotel! It was still over 30 degrees and very humid. It was a long, hot walk back to our hotel. We did have a bit of a break in a square where a couple of men were playing street chess. We joined a few onlookers, and like them enjoyed a cold ice cream. Then, somehow, I managed the rest of that hot walk and finally fell onto the bed with huge relief. There was still no movement in the air. So as we lay there, seeking some relief from cool, wet towels, we made plans to get out of the city the next day, Sunday, when the heat threatened to be hotter and the crowds threatened to be much larger.  More of that anon.

To see more photos of this day in Salzburg, go to our flickr site:

www.flickr.com/photos/jtdytravels

Once on our site, just click on albums and select the relevant albums:

AUT: Salzburg a) Mirabell Palace

AUT: Salzburg b) St Andräs Church

AUT: Salzburg c) Walk to the Old Town

AUT: Salzburg d) Huhensalzburg Fortress’

More anon

Jennie and David

Photography copyright ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

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P1150533  ©   JY  of  jtdytravels

P1150533 © JT of jtdytravels

In the hills behind the Cornish coastal town of Penzance, in the small village of Madron, is the National Trust Property of Trengwainton Garden.   Although the manor house at the top of the garden is still a private residence, the garden is open to the public.  We walked up the long gentle slope of this rather narrow garden by a winding path through dense plantings; we returned by the main driveway bedecked with Rhododendron on one side and a small stream planted with bog plants on the other.  The moorland misty rain had returned, but that didn’t dampen our enjoyment of this lovely garden.

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P1150460  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150460 © JT of jtdytravels

This garden is known for its collections of magnolias, rhododendron and camellias.

Although some had finished flowering, there were plenty left for us to enjoy.

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P1150517  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150517 © JT of jtdytravels

I love azaleas; so simple and simply beautiful, especially when jewelled with rain drops.

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P1060386  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060386 © JT of jtdytravels

Because spring had come late to Cornwall, there were still some magnolia flowers to enjoy.

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P1150472  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150472 © JT of jtdytravels

Both sides of the winding pathway are densely planted with a wide variety of plants…

plants that have their origins in many places across the globe.

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P1150474  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150474 © JT of jtdytravels

The ‘gulf stream’ climate here is perfect for the Australian native, Dicksonia.

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P1060390  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060390 ©  DY of jtdytravels

Many new season fronds were just beginning to uncurl.

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P1060396  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060396 ©  DY of jtdytravels

The unusual Fuchsia excorticata is a native plant of New Zealand.  Sometimes known in Cornwall by the common name of ‘Sunburn Tree’, the trunk of this large fuchsia is characterised by its red peeling bark.  This flower has an unusual blue pollen. The flowers are followed by dark purple, almost black berries, which some people say are delicious either raw or cooked.

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P1150463  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150463 © JT of jtdytravels

Some of the branches of the older trees have grown into strange shapes as they have sought the sun.

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P1060382  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060382 © JT of jtdytravels

Delightful rhododendron bells draw attention to themselves against swathes of dark green foliage .

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P1060403  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060403 © DY of jtdytravels

We think this plant belongs to the Malvacaea family of plants.

Does anyone know the name of this beauty?

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P1060404  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060404 © DY of jtdytravels

I’ve added two more photos of this flower in the hope that someone will identify it.

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P1060405  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060405 © DY of jtdytravels

In any case, it is a joy to behold!

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P1150487  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150487 © JT of jtdytravels

One densely planted part of the garden is backed by a large Pieris japonica.

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P1150486  ©  JT  of  jtsytravels

P1150486 © JT of jtdytravels

A closer look at the tree shows the beautiful softness of the combination of pinks and light greens.

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P1150495  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150495 © JT of jtdytravels

And a much closer look, shows the tiny bell like pink flowers of Pieris japonica.

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P1150502  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150502 © JT of jtdytravels

There are over 70 species of Hosta that can be used as dense and attractive ‘fillers’ along garden edges.

But, beware!  They are much loved as food by snails and slugs!

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P1060402  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060402 © DY of jtdytravels

On the other hand, they also act as beautiful receptacles for rain drops.

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P1150525  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150525 © JT of jtdytravels

As the spring flowers were beginning to fade in the garden,

so the summer flowering groups, like the hydrangeas, began to bloom.

It’s is certainly a garden for all seasons.

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P1060422  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060422 © DY of jtdytravels

The path crosses a small bridge where a pond is the highlight of the view.

It’s a good place to take a quiet rest

as the water bubbles out under the bridge over a small waterfall.

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P1060415  ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060415 © DY of jtdytravels

The light, misty rain persisted, but only enough to give rhododendron flowers a refreshing glow.

The name comes from Ancient Greek:  rhódon meaning “rose” and déndron meaning ” tree”.

This photo gives a real hint of the reason for the ‘rose’ tag.

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P1060431  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1060431 © DY of jtdytravels

Some rhododendron trees in their native habitats can grow very large indeed.

Even here, some were large enough to shelter beneath their branches.

That gave time to enjoy shapes of trunks and patterns on bark.

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P1150557 ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150557 © JT of jtdytravels

Above us, hung more of those delightful Rhododendron bells.

There are over 1000 species of this plant, so gardeners are spoilt for choice.

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P1060425  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060425 © JT of jtdytravels

Finally the house came into view.  We had reached the top of the path.

This property, not open to the public, was once the residence of the powerful and very wealthy Cornish Arundell Family,  From small beginnings in the early 1200’s, when their only possession was the manor of Treloy in the parish of St Columb Major, the Arundells reached the height of their wealth and influence in the late sixteenth century when this house was built.  By then the family owned twenty-eight manors in Cornwall as well as manors and other properties in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire.

The house was altered and extented in the 18th and 19th centuries and is now a Grade II listed building.  In 1814, this estate was bought by a Jamaican sugar plantation owner, Rose Price.  However, by 1833, his fortunes were diminished when his slaves in Jamaica were freed by the Emancipation Act.  In 1867, the house was bought by the Bolitho family.  Members of that family still live here.

The gardens were given to the National Trust in 1961 and are very well cared for by that organisation.  We’ll explore a very different part of this garden in our next Cornwall episode.

Jennie  and David

Photography copyright © JT and DY  of jtdytravels

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One of the best known features of Trelissick is its collection of Rhododendrons which come into their own in Spring.  Many of them continue to flower into late Spring and we were able to enjoy these, the very essence of a Cornish garden it seems to me.

P1150148  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150148 © JT of jtdytravels

One of the best Rhododendron species to grow well in the upper part of the garden, where the ground is thinner and drier, is the rich red ‘Gwilt King’, a hybrid of Rhododendron griersonianum.

P1060262   ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060262 © DY of jtdytravels

When a touch of sunlight catches these flowers, they seem to glow.

P1150140  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150140 © JT of jtdytravels

There were still plenty of new flowers to come even in mid June.

P1060267  ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060267 © DY of jtdytravels

Rhododendron buds are elegant and deserve just as close a look as the more showy flowers.

P1150196  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150196 © JT of jtdytravels

Along the Rhododendron walk, we found this moss covered seat.  Whenever I find such an empty seat, I’m reminded of UK friends who enjoyed exploring gardens with me in years gone by but who are now no longer here for me to sit and have a chat with.  I love the memories of the good times we spent together in gardens such as these and am grateful for those special times of friendship.

P1150141  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150141 © JT of jtdytravels

Walking on, we found several other Rhododendron species in flower.  Many of these were brought to Trelissick Gardens from the famous Bodnant Gardens in north Wales by Ida and Ronald Copeland when they lived here.  I don’t know their species names but each and every one of them was a delight.  I hope you enjoy our photos of a selected few of them.

P1150199

P1150199 ©  JT  of jtdytravels

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P1150153  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150153 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1150195  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150195 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1150190  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150190 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1150128   ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150128 © JT of jtdytravels

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P1150198   ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150198 © JT of jtdytravels

As well as Rhododendrons, there were still some azaleas in flower.

P1150084   ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150084 © JT of jtdytravels

My favourite is the Mollis Azalea. It reminds me of my wonderful Mum!

P1060253  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060253 © DY of jtdytravels

Other trees in flower were Cornus, or Dogwoods.

P1060253   ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060253 © DY of jtdytravels

Have you ever really looked at the centre of a Dogwood flower?

P1150122   ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150122 © JT of jtdytravels

In amongst the borders are plants like Aquilegia, cottage garden and border essentials with their delicate nodding flowers and delightful lacy foliage which is a rare blue-green colour. They are a beautiful foil for other larger, heavier plants and , although the fresh foliage starts growing in early spring, the flowers develop just in time to fill in when spring flowers begin to fade.

They are commonly known as Columbines or, a name I love for these beauties, Granny’s Bonnets . 

P1060190  ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060190 © DY of jtdytravels

This delicately petalled Roscoea cautleyoides is another Asian plant that’s grown in this garden.  Although it’s a member of the ginger family, which has mostly tropical species, this plant comes from the mountain regions of  Sichuan and Yunann provinces. 

P1150070  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150070 © JT of jtdytravels

Another delicate white flower is the bell of Polygonatum or Solomon’s Seal.  Once classified as a member of the Lily family, this plant is now classified as a member of the family Asparagaceae.  It’s hard to keep up with these classification changes at times!

P1150082  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150082 © JT of jtdytravels

Most Cornish gardens make some use of the lovely Astrantia along the borders of the garden.

The flowers range from white to a deep wine red.

P1150082  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150082 © JT of jtdytravels

If we look closely we’ll see that this one has a visitor – a tiny green beetle.

P1060249  ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060249 © DY of jtdytravels

Another plant used to great effect in this garden’s borders is the Geranium, commonly known in UK as Cranesbill.

I love the veined petals. There are many colours for gardeners to use and they flower for a long period.

P1150052  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150052 © JT of jtdytravels

A flower that adds a wonderful dash of colour to any border is Alstroemeria commonly called Peruvian Lily.

P1150201  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150201 © JT of jtdytravels

Time was getting away from us and, reluctantly, we followed this man and his grandson back to the carpark. I hope they had enjoyed their Trelissick experience as much as we had done.  But we still had a long way to go to Sennen Cove near Lands End where we were to stay for the next three nights.

Apart from visiting a quiet Cornish beach for the weekend, our goal in going to that southern part of Cornwall was to learn more about the kind of lives lived by David’s forbears working in the tin and copper mines from the 1600s to the 1850s when some of them made the big decision to emigrate to Australia.

More of that story anon.

Jennie and David

All photography copyright ©  Jt and Dy of jtdytravels

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The woodland walk between the Trelissick Gardens and the River Fal is densely planted to help protect the gardens from the wild Cornish winter winds. On a calm day like the one we enjoyed in mid June, it was hard to imagine those harsh winds.

P1150091  ©  JT of jtdytravels

P1150091 ©  JT of jtdytravels

It’s a very pleasant path with its glimpses of the river through the trees.

P1150090  ©  JT of jtdytravels

P1150090  ©  JT of jtdytravels

The tiny flowers of Pink Campion, a member of the Silene family, are common along such pathways as well as along roadsides and in hedges all across Cornwall.

P1060207  ©  Dy  of jtdytravels

P1060207  ©  Dy of jtdytravels

The common name of this lovely flower, Bastard Balm, does not really fit with its beauty!  Its botanical name is Melittis melissophyllum but its common name comes from the fact that it imitates the members of the Balm family, the Germanders.  The flowers can have pink or purple centres. They are native to Southern England from New Forest to Cornwall and in South Wales. They grow in shady habitats like this woodland margin.  I’ve seen them before on my walks in the English and Welsh countryside in years gone by and I really enjoyed finding them again.  I felt sorry for the people who just marched along the path without stopping to enjoy the beauty of these tiny woodland flowers.  Maybe they’ve seen them before; but maybe not!

P1060206  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1060206  ©  DY of jtdytravels

Foxgloves are a favourite of mine. They were in hedgerows and along roadsides wherever we went in UK. They are also used as garden plants to good effect and there are now some differently coloured hybrids.  I love to look deep inside the flower; no two are the same.

P1150046  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150046  ©  JT of jtdytravels

These tiny, delicate white flowers with their fine green veins on the petals, are sometimes hard to see amongst the dense greenery.

I should know their name but have forgotten!  Any help welcome.

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P1150098  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150098  ©  JT of jtdytravels

Cow parsley was everywhere along the Cornish roadsides and was particularly lovely along this pathway.

P1150094  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150094  ©  JT of jtdytravels

This spectacular tree on the banks of the river stopped us both in our tracks.

It’s magnificent.

P1060208  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060208  ©  DY of jtdytravels

A break in the trees brought us this river view with the bright yellow of rapeseed on the hillside.

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P1150096  ©  JT of jtdytravels

P1150096  ©  JT of jtdytravels

Yachts were moored in the safety of the Trelissick Estate’s bay.

P1150100  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150100  ©  JT of jtdytravels

A small beach borders one of the farm paddocks. Watch out for the cow pats!

Did these cows produce the wonderful clotted cream that’s served in the cafe?

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P1060215  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1060215  ©  DY of jtdytravels

Looking back, a slope leads up to one edge of the gardens.

P1150105   ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150105  ©  JT of jtdytravels

We walked on until we came to a steep, grassy meadow where people’s feet had made a track back up towards the house.  It was rather a steep track, so we rested half way up for me to catch my breath and for us to enjoy the view.  The rest also gave us time to think about the origins of Trelissick House and Gardens, a place that is very well known in Cornwall.  Indeed, it’s considered to be one of the great gardens of the world.   But there are many such great estates in Cornwall.  So,where had the money come from to build these mansions and huge gardens?  The answer is fairly simple; copper, tin and clay mining.  In the case of Trelissick, two of the former owner’s fortunes had come from mines in Cornwall.  One was Ralph Daniell whose father had been known as “guinea-a-minute Daniell”, owner of copper and tin mines.  Another, Ronald Copeland’s family, were porcelain makers of Spode-Copeland fame and that business relied on the fine china clay mined from the pits in Cornwall.

One of the reasons that we were in Cornwall was to research David’s family, some of whom had worked in those mines.  Along with thousands of other miners, men, women and children, they worked for a pittance and for long hours, in difficult and very dangerous conditions whilst the owners grew ever richer on the produce of the miner’s labours.  It’s true, of course, that the owners invested their money in developing the mines and that they gave people work.  But it was the miner’s hard labour that paid for these estates.

So yes, while we do enjoy visiting the big estate gardens, we also know that they came about at the price of hardship in the lives of so many miners and their families, some of them David’s ancestors.  To us, the gardens are a kind of living memorial to those workers.

P1060246  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1060246  ©  DY of jtdytravels

The Grecian styled Trelissick House, together with the fairy castle water tower, were built by Ralph Daniell’s son in 1825.  After the Daniell’s became bankrupt, there were several other owners before 1928 when the house and gardens were bought by Leonard Cunliffe, Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.  He passed it on to his step daughter, Ida Copeland, who was married to Ronald Copeland (of the famous Spode Copeland Porcelain company).  It’s still the Copeland family home today.

However, the current generation of the Copeland family are now leaving Trelissick;  moving out to a smaller house.  In the process of their downsizing, they have auctioned off (on 23rd and 24th July 2013) most of the furniture, art works and collectables that represent generations of their family’s life.  Pieces for sale included an entire collection of Spode-Copeland ceramics which tell the complete story of the Copelands and their pottery manufacture over the last 200 years.  Reports of what has been called ‘one of the greatest house sales in living memory’ in UK show that many of the prices fetched at auction were well above the estimated value.  We know that the National Trust hoped to buy as many pieces as they could so that those pieces can be kept in the house when it’s opened to the public in the future.  We hope they were successful.

P1150164  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150164  ©  JT of jtdytravels

And after that rest and contemplation, it was time to climb further up the hill and enjoy the view from the house.  It was not the sunny day as shown in the National Trust brochures, but it was impressive none-the-less.  A bite of lunch was next on the list and then time to explore some more of the garden…. and that’s for the next episode of the Trelissick story.

Jennie and David

All photography copyright © JT and DY of jtdytravels

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