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Archive for September, 2013

I’m currently writing posts with photos on two other blog sites. Why not join me there.

Overseas travel stories and photos are on

www.jtdytravels.com

Trekking and exploring in wild and out of the way places is on:

www.dymusings.com

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While taking a break from our Cornwall posts, we are writing about adventure trekking in the stunning scenery of the Kamchatka Peninsula in Far East Russia.  Why not join us for this journey.  J and D

These posts can be found on the following site:

www.dymusings.com

 

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P1150533  ©   JY  of  jtdytravels

P1150533 © JT of jtdytravels

In the hills behind the Cornish coastal town of Penzance, in the small village of Madron, is the National Trust Property of Trengwainton Garden.   Although the manor house at the top of the garden is still a private residence, the garden is open to the public.  We walked up the long gentle slope of this rather narrow garden by a winding path through dense plantings; we returned by the main driveway bedecked with Rhododendron on one side and a small stream planted with bog plants on the other.  The moorland misty rain had returned, but that didn’t dampen our enjoyment of this lovely garden.

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P1150460  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150460 © JT of jtdytravels

This garden is known for its collections of magnolias, rhododendron and camellias.

Although some had finished flowering, there were plenty left for us to enjoy.

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P1150517  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150517 © JT of jtdytravels

I love azaleas; so simple and simply beautiful, especially when jewelled with rain drops.

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P1060386  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060386 © JT of jtdytravels

Because spring had come late to Cornwall, there were still some magnolia flowers to enjoy.

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P1150472  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150472 © JT of jtdytravels

Both sides of the winding pathway are densely planted with a wide variety of plants…

plants that have their origins in many places across the globe.

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P1150474  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150474 © JT of jtdytravels

The ‘gulf stream’ climate here is perfect for the Australian native, Dicksonia.

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P1060390  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060390 ©  DY of jtdytravels

Many new season fronds were just beginning to uncurl.

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P1060396  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060396 ©  DY of jtdytravels

The unusual Fuchsia excorticata is a native plant of New Zealand.  Sometimes known in Cornwall by the common name of ‘Sunburn Tree’, the trunk of this large fuchsia is characterised by its red peeling bark.  This flower has an unusual blue pollen. The flowers are followed by dark purple, almost black berries, which some people say are delicious either raw or cooked.

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P1150463  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150463 © JT of jtdytravels

Some of the branches of the older trees have grown into strange shapes as they have sought the sun.

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P1060382  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060382 © JT of jtdytravels

Delightful rhododendron bells draw attention to themselves against swathes of dark green foliage .

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P1060403  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060403 © DY of jtdytravels

We think this plant belongs to the Malvacaea family of plants.

Does anyone know the name of this beauty?

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P1060404  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060404 © DY of jtdytravels

I’ve added two more photos of this flower in the hope that someone will identify it.

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P1060405  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060405 © DY of jtdytravels

In any case, it is a joy to behold!

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P1150487  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150487 © JT of jtdytravels

One densely planted part of the garden is backed by a large Pieris japonica.

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P1150486  ©  JT  of  jtsytravels

P1150486 © JT of jtdytravels

A closer look at the tree shows the beautiful softness of the combination of pinks and light greens.

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P1150495  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150495 © JT of jtdytravels

And a much closer look, shows the tiny bell like pink flowers of Pieris japonica.

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P1150502  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150502 © JT of jtdytravels

There are over 70 species of Hosta that can be used as dense and attractive ‘fillers’ along garden edges.

But, beware!  They are much loved as food by snails and slugs!

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P1060402  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060402 © DY of jtdytravels

On the other hand, they also act as beautiful receptacles for rain drops.

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P1150525  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1150525 © JT of jtdytravels

As the spring flowers were beginning to fade in the garden,

so the summer flowering groups, like the hydrangeas, began to bloom.

It’s is certainly a garden for all seasons.

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P1060422  ©  DY  of  jtdytravels

P1060422 © DY of jtdytravels

The path crosses a small bridge where a pond is the highlight of the view.

It’s a good place to take a quiet rest

as the water bubbles out under the bridge over a small waterfall.

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P1060415  ©  DY  of jtdytravels

P1060415 © DY of jtdytravels

The light, misty rain persisted, but only enough to give rhododendron flowers a refreshing glow.

The name comes from Ancient Greek:  rhódon meaning “rose” and déndron meaning ” tree”.

This photo gives a real hint of the reason for the ‘rose’ tag.

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P1060431  ©  DY of jtdytravels

P1060431 © DY of jtdytravels

Some rhododendron trees in their native habitats can grow very large indeed.

Even here, some were large enough to shelter beneath their branches.

That gave time to enjoy shapes of trunks and patterns on bark.

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P1150557 ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1150557 © JT of jtdytravels

Above us, hung more of those delightful Rhododendron bells.

There are over 1000 species of this plant, so gardeners are spoilt for choice.

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P1060425  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1060425 © JT of jtdytravels

Finally the house came into view.  We had reached the top of the path.

This property, not open to the public, was once the residence of the powerful and very wealthy Cornish Arundell Family,  From small beginnings in the early 1200’s, when their only possession was the manor of Treloy in the parish of St Columb Major, the Arundells reached the height of their wealth and influence in the late sixteenth century when this house was built.  By then the family owned twenty-eight manors in Cornwall as well as manors and other properties in Devon, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset and Wiltshire.

The house was altered and extented in the 18th and 19th centuries and is now a Grade II listed building.  In 1814, this estate was bought by a Jamaican sugar plantation owner, Rose Price.  However, by 1833, his fortunes were diminished when his slaves in Jamaica were freed by the Emancipation Act.  In 1867, the house was bought by the Bolitho family.  Members of that family still live here.

The gardens were given to the National Trust in 1961 and are very well cared for by that organisation.  We’ll explore a very different part of this garden in our next Cornwall episode.

Jennie  and David

Photography copyright © JT and DY  of jtdytravels

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After a day of activity in Iluka, whether it be walking on the beaches or in the bush, playing golf or bowls, swimming, reading or just lazing about, a great way to end the day is to stroll along the path beside the bay to watch the sunset.  I did just that one day after a late afternoon visit to the mouth of the river and a walk on the ocean beach.

P1240762  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240762 © JT of jtdytravels

Where the Clarence River is channeled out to sea by two long breakwaters,

dolphins can often be seen.

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P1240759  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240759 © JT of jtdytravels

By the time the sun had begun to sink low in the sky,

the main beach at Iluka was almost deserted.

Summer visitors had not yet arrived.

It had been a warm winter’s day but now the breeze was a little chilly.

  It was time to go back to my room at Iluka Motel.

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P1240992  ©   JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240992 © JT of jtdytravels

I made one last stop for the day at Iluka Bay.

There, I found birds also ‘coming home’ from their day out.

A small flock of corollas flew in to hunt for a last minute feed of seeds.

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P1240994  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240994 © JT of jtdytravels

A couple of Ibis also flew in.  This one showed off its lacy tail.

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P1250015  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1250015 © JT of jtdytravels

It soon began to search the waters for a late afternoon feed.

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P1240779  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240779 © JT of jtdytravels

A small boat caused rippling waves behind this grey heron.

The waters had begun to take on a tinge of the colours of the setting sun.

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P1250026  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1250026 © JT of jtdytravels

A couple of ducks shovelled for food in the mud.

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P1250008  ©   JT  of  jtdytravels

P1250008 © JT of jtdytravels

The pelicans swooped in for a final feed along with a small group of seagulls.

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P1240964  ©   JT  of jtdytravels

P1240964 © JT of jtdytravels

As the sun sank even lower, this pelican seemed to pose for his portrait.

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P1240952  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240952 © JT of jtdytravels

The late afternoon light also added extra charm to a common seagull.

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P1240959  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240959 © JT of jtdytravels

Even the boardwalk took on a golden glow.

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P1240766   ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240766 © JT of jtdytravels

On a quiet part of the bay, the water had retreated leaving puddles in the mud,

providing the opportunity for this heron portrait.

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P1250012  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1250012 © JT of jtdytravels

More pelicans arrived as

a ribbon of golden sunlight made its way across the bay.

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P1250021  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1250021 © JT of jtdytravels

By this time, the other evening walkers had left the path.

I was left alone to enjoy this quiet evening scene.

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P1250022  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1250022 © JT of jtdytravels

The sky burnt a firey red as the sun slipped away

giving a final kiss of light to wispy clouds.

This is indeed a special place.

I’ve promised myself to return one day.

Jennie

Photography  ©  copyright JT  of  jtdytravels

(Accommodation was at Iluka Motel… I can recommend it)

Stories and photos of our overseas travels can be found on

www.jtdytravels.com

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I have recently put some new posts re my current travelling in Australia on my alternate site:

 

jtlifesgood.wordpress.com

 

I will be back to UK posts in the near future.

 

Jennie

 

 

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For the keen walker, there are walks in abundance from the village of Iluka.  The walk beside Iluka Bay is the gentlest.  But there are walks along the beaches facing the Pacific Ocean and even more through a rainforest and through Bundjalong National Park.

P1240948  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240948 © JT of jtdytravels

The main road from the Pacific Highway into Iluka goes through the Bundjalung  National Park.  Side roads lead off into the forest and to the bluffs and beaches of the Pacific Ocean. The roads are unsealed but in good condition and the drive through tunnels of trees is a peaceful start to a day out in the bush.

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P1240877  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240877 © JT of jtdytravels

The best known, and very well set up bush parking area is at Iluka Bluff.  Leaving the car here, you can choose to enjoy a walk or a rest on the beach, pick your way across the rocks at the headland, climb up to the bluff or walk in the forest; or do all of the above.

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P1240879  ©  JT  f jtdytravels

P1240879 © JT f jtdytravels

My first choice was the beach – not to swim or laze in the sun but to walk.

When I was there, this beach was not patrolled, so care is needed if swimming.

One part of this beach is called Shark Bay – enough said!

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P1240885  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240885 © JT of jtdytravels

I shared this long beautiful stretch of coast with just two other people.

With a gentle sea on one side

and a forest alive with native birds on the other

it was a most pleasant walk.

There would no doubt be many more people enjoying this beach in summer.

P1240881  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240881 © JT of jtdytravels

However, this is not a bare foot beach.  It’s made up of small shells so …

a good pair of walking shoes was essential.

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P1240896  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240896 © JT of jtdytravels

Coming back from my beach walk, I began to explore the rocky headland.

It was the resting place that morning for hundreds of birds, most of them small terns.

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P1240893  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240893 © JT of jtdytravels

Amongst them were Cormorants and, of course, sea gulls.

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P1240902  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240902 © JT of jtdytravels

My favourite bird of the morning was this Brahminy Kite (Haliastur Indus).  I had taken a short bush walk to get further out on the rocks below the bluff.  I found this magnificent bird sitting on a rock shelf quietly finishing off a feed of fish.  T’was a magic moment.

Brahminy Kites feed exclusively on fish and other marine animals.  I have read that they often scavenge for dead fish floating on the surface rather than catching live fish.  Once this bird had finished its meal, I enjoyed watching it soar high over the rock platform.

Iluka is almost to the southern edge of the Brahminy Kite’s range.  They occur only in warmer coastal areas and on offshore islands; in the eastern states they may occur from Port Macquarie north and, in Western Australia, they can be seen north of Carnarvon.  We saw them in the tidal rivers of the Kimberleys when we were there a few years ago.

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P1240910  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240910 © JT of jtdytravels

There are good paths through the seaside scrub which seems to be alive with birds.

Most are impossible to photograph as they flit through the trees.

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P1240912  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240912 © JT of jtdytravels

Some are much more used to human company. This magpie joined me on my walk.

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P1240913  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240913 © JT of jtdytravels

A Masked Lapwing was a little more wary as he trotted across a more open area of park.

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P1240939  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240939 © JT of jtdytravels

The common Australian native tree, the Paper Bark, Melaleuca sp., abounds in this park.

Birds love them and some artists like to use the papery bark in their creations.

However, collecting this bark in a National Park is not permitted.

Take only photos, leave only footprints – that’s the rule.

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P1240947  ©  Jt  of  jtdytravels

P1240947 © Jt of jtdytravels

Day visitors are well catered for with plenty of tables in shady places for picnics.

There are also eco friendly long drop, composting toilets near the car park.

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P1240938  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240938 © JT of jtdytravels

A shaded, raised information area also has a picnic table and tank water.

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P1240935  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240935 © JT of jtdytravels

From the information platform, a steep set of steps leads up towards the top of the bluff.

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P1240922  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240922 © JT of jtdytravels

From the top of the steps, a steepish gravelled path with steps leads further upwards.

A more gentle board walk path then leads on through the bush.

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P1240921  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240921 © JT of jtdytravels

There are some interesting trees to look at along the way.

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P1240934  ©  JT  of  jtdytravels

P1240934 © JT of jtdytravels

A volunteer landcare group has been busy cleaning out weeds in this area.

They’ve also planted several more native trees and bushes.

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P1240924  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240924 © JT of jtdytravels

Finally, the look out comes into view.

And the view from the top is well worth the climb.

This is a great place to watch for whales on their migration route.

Looking south is the breakwater lined mouth of the Clarence River.

Yamba can be seen on the hill beyond.

Iluka is further back to the right behind another long, sandy beach.

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P1240927  ©  JT  of jtdytravels

P1240927 © JT of jtdytravels

The sound and sight of waves folding over rocks below is something I always enjoy.

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P1240926  ©  Jt  of jtdytravels

P1240926 © Jt of jtdytravels

There were many more walks I could have taken in this National Park,

but I was happy to take a rest here

and enjoy the solitude and the beauty of the sea scape.

The other walks will have to wait until I return some other time!

Jennie

Photography  © Copyright  JT  of  jtdytravels

More travel stories and photos of our overseas adventures can be found on

http://www.jtdytravels.com

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